View from last years all-Parsons show, "Making Meaning"

Call for Senior Undergraduate Entries: Parsons Festival 2015 Exhibition

The Parsons Festival Exhibition is designed to showcase talent from across Parsons. If you’re in a bachelor’s or associate’s degree program and set to graduate this spring, show us what you’ve got!

View from last years all-Parsons show, "Making Meaning"

View from last years all-Parsons show, “Making Meaning”

About you: You’re graduating. You’ve spent the last few years developing an expertise, a way of thinking, a way of designing that builds on your studies but is unique to you. You’ve put that perspective into your work. And you’d like it to be seen within the broader Parsons context. And you’d like it to be seen in one of Parsons’ signature campus locations during graduation.

About the show: Combining works from across all of Parsons’ undergraduate and associate’s degree programs, this exhibition will take place in the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, including the Kellen and Aronson galleries, hallway, and lobby. It will be on view as a highlight of this year’s Parsons Festival from May 7 through May 22, 2015.

How to apply: Read below and fill out the entry form. It asks for things like your name and program, along with images, video, or links that’ll give an idea of your work. It’s pretty straightforward and makes sure you provide all the information that’s needed to review your submission.

Important dates and information:
Eligibility — Open to all graduating students in BFA, BBA, BS, and AAS programs

Deadline for submission — March 15, 2015, at midnight
Notification — April 8, 2015
Delivery of work — April 20–23, 2015 (You must be able to turn in your work by April 23.)
Exhibition on view — May 7–22, 2015
Submission form – festival.parsons.edu/2015
For questions about the exhibition, contact parsonsfestival@newschool.edu.

NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium: Kent Worcester on Ten Great Cartoonists You’ve Never Heard Of

rooum-72-dip1The 117th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 10, 2015 at 7pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).

Free and open to the public!

Kent Worcester on Ten Great Cartoonists You’ve Never Heard Of
In recent years there has been a flurry of scholarly interest in comics and cartooning, much of which has focused on a relatively small number of cartoonists. This illustrated talk will make the case for looking beyond the usual suspects and will highlight the “lost art” of ten highly talented creators who are not yet on the comics studies radar. Perhaps one or two of their names will be familiar to devoted fans of political cartooning, but very little has been written about any one of the following: M. Verne Breitmayer, Jesse Cohen, Pele deLappe, Phil Evans, Jimmy Friell, John Olday, Charles Peattie, Donald Rooum, Laura Slobe, and Ben Yomen. This presentation will also feature a “hidden bonus track” – cartoons by a famous nineteenth century writer who was also a capable illustrator.

Kent Worcester teaches political theory at Marymount Manhattan College. He is the author, editor, or coeditor of eight books, including A Comics Studies Reader (coedited with Jeet Heer, 2009) and The Superhero Reader (coedited with Charles Hatfield and Jeet Heer, 2013). His latest book is Peter Bagge: Conversations (2015). He regularly gives public talks on New York City and Comics on behalf of the New York Council for the Humanities’ Speakers in the Humanities series.

Student of the Week: Daniel Marin Medina

Daniel is a Colombian illustrator who gets a lot of satisfaction from making people uncomfortable. He tends to stay within the realm of queerness, sexualities, histories, and end up drawing a lot of bodies as a result, whether as lanky doodles or alcohol-soaked figures. He draws as often as he can on whatever he can find. His illustrations find their place on sticky notes, used pizza plates, and in the index pages of books on queer utopias.

Check out more of his work at danielmarinmedina.com or on Instagram @dannonmarinade.
You can also contact him via email at danielmarinmedina@gmail.com

Student: Daniel Marin MedinaStudent: Daniel Marin Medina Student: Daniel Marin Medina

New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium for March 3, 2015

The 117th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 7pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

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Paul Tumey on Forgotten Funnies: of America in the Comics of Percy Winterbottom, Dwig, and Ving Fuller

Forgotten today, the works of these three cartoonists were widely published and enjoyed a respectable readership in their successive eras. Presenting rare comics and original research, comics scholar and writer Paul Tumey paints a four-color triptych of lost comics masters:

Percy Winterbottom was a pen name for George Beckenbaugh, a humorist/cartoonist who had a brief career in comics in the late 1890s until he died in 1901 at age 36. He conceived of Klondike, a strange, satirical comic strip, presented in deliberately comically primitive art and language, about a parade of larger than life American archetypes that reflect what American music scholar Greil Marcus has called the “old, weird America.”

Clare Victor “Dwig” Dwiggins came of age in idyllic rural America in the late 1800s and worked in comics from 1900 to the 1950s. He enjoyed a boyhood much like that of Mark Twain’s characters Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Working at first in whimsical illustrations and screwball comics, Dwig later sought to recapture his magical childhood in syndicated comics like School Days, and Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, reflecting the rise of nostalgia in industrial America.

Ving Fuller’s career spans the 1920s to the early 1960s. He was the barely successful cartoonist brother of famed Hollywood maverick filmmaker Sam Fuller. Creator of the first psychiatrist in comics, Doc Syke, Fuller made urban screwball comics that dealt with a host of post-war American neuroses, including gags about the atomic bomb that first appeared mere weeks after Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

When juxtaposed together, the lives and work of these three obscure cartoonists tell a larger story that helps shed light on American comics and culture in the first half of the twentieth century.

 

Paul Tumey was a co-editor and essayist for The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts 2013). He was also a contributing editor and essayist of Society is Nix (Sunday Press, 2013). His essay on Harry Tuthill appears as the introduction to The Bungle Family 1930 (IDW Library of American Comics, 2014). His work can be read regularly in his column, Framed! at the online Comics Journal (www.tcj.com).

NY Comics & Picture-story Symposia for Feb. 24 and 25, 2015

Please note:  Two meetings of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held this week!

The 116th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Frank Santoro on “Comics as Music: borrowing compositional strategies from music and applying them to comics.” Frank Santoro will present works from various cartoonists to illustrate how comic book layouts can be thought of in musical terms.
Frank Santoro (b.1972) is the author of Storeyville, Pompeii, and numerous other comic books (all published by PictureBox) and is also a columnist for The Comics Journal. He co-founded the comics criticism magazine ComicsComics with Dan Nadel and Timothy Hodler. He has also created a correspondence course for comic book makers and has taught drawing at Parsons School of Design. Santoro maintains and edits the Comics Workbook tumblr blog as a showcase for his students as well as new and under-appreciated comics work. His comics have been published in Kramers Ergot, Mome, and The Ganzfeld. He has exhibited at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, The Academy of Arts and Letters in New York, and at The Fumetto Festival in Switzerland. He lives and works in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. http://franksantoro.tumblr.com/

 

 

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The 112th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 7pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note: This event was snowed-out in January and is now rescheduled! Please note Wednesday date and 7pm starting time!.

Nick Thorkelson on Herbert Marcuse and Pedagogical Comics
Nick Thorkelson will talk about his projected book-length nonfiction comic on Marcuse, the German philosopher who was a mentor to the 1960s radical movements. The talk will also survey the field of pedagogical comics, from Rius and Rifas to Gonick and Sacco, and Nick’s contributions to that field which include The Underhanded History of the USA, The Comic Strip of Neoliberalism, Economic Meltdown Funnies, and short comics about Mr. Block, Kenneth Patchen, Yiddish poets, radical Christians, and the origins of modern jazz.
The Marcuse book situates Herbert Marcuse in the world of German anti-fascist refugees (Brecht, Adorno, Fritz Lang, Walter Benjamin, etc.), their debates regarding “high” and “low” art, and their contributions to American culture, which arguably include film noir and its poor relations, Crime Does Not Pay and The Spirit.  The book will incorporate Nick’s latest comics story, “You Had to Be There,” about the German historian George Mosse who excited midwestern college students in the 1960s and 70s with his explorations of the detritus of European popular culture.

Nick Thorkelson is a former editorial cartoonist for the Boston Globe who creates comics and cartoons for groups working on industrial safety, worker rights, social welfare, peace, and the environment. For the last ten years he has worked closely with historian Paul Buhle on a series of nonfiction comics, including a 4-pager on the 50th anniversary of Herbert Marcuse’s One Dimensional Man which appears in the current issue of Jewish Currents.

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Student of the Week: Fernando Sarmiento

Fernando Sarmiento, originally from Venezuela is a senior studying Illustration. He enjoys exploring fantasy and sci-fi through narrative, symbolism and character design, with an inclination for children’s illustration.His mediums of preference include but is not limited to: Graphite and color pencils, microns, oil and acrylic paints, polymer clays, Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop.

You can find his work at http://fernando-sarmiento.tumblr.com/ and contact him at sarmf237@newschool.edu
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New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium

The 115th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. See the Spring ’15 Schedule here.

Presentations by Archie Rand and Alexander Rothman on Poetry Comics

  1. Archie Rand on hisPsalm 68 project and other poetry-image works.
    Artist Archie Randwas born in Brooklyn and studied in New York City. He received a B.A. in cinegraphics from the Pratt Institute in 1970, later studying at the Art Students League of New York under Larry Poons. In 1966, he had his first solo show at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York, launching a career of over 80 solo exhibitions and 200 group exhibitions thus far in the U.S. and abroad.
    A frequent collaborator with artists and poets, Rand has worked as draughtsman with Robert Creeley and John Yau exploring such subjects as jazz, the Bible, and Jewish history. In 1974, he completed murals for the 13,000 square foot interior of B’nai Yosef Synagogue in Brooklyn, a monumental three-year project. Rand has administered and taught at numerous graduate art programs and appeared in major art journals and newspapers for over three decades. The recipient of numerous grants and awards, Rand is Presidential Professor of Art at Brooklyn College.
    http://www.archierand.com/

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Image by Archie Rand from Psalm 68 project

  1. Alexander Rothmanon Close Reading Comics Poetry.
    If a cartoonist sets out to make “comics poetry,” what tools are available to her? How is her work likely to relate to other kinds of comics, or to poetry for that matter? Through close readings, this talk will explore how creators have answered these questions over the last fifty years, with an emphasis on the present day. Specifically, we’ll look at work by Joe Brainard and the New York School Poets, Warren Craghead, John Hankiewicz, and Marion Fayolle.
    Alexander Rothmanis a cartoonist and poet whose work has appeared in venues including The Indiana Review, Drunken Boat, The Brooklyn Rail, and š! He is publisher and co-editor-in-chief of Ink Brick, a micro-press dedicated to comics poetry, and he cohosts Comics for Grownups, a review podcast available on iTunes. See more of his work at inkbrick.com.

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The image is by Marion Fayolle

New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium for Feb. 10, 2015

The 114th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

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Aidan Koch will discuss the prevalence and participation of comics and comics format in contemporary art.

Aidan Koch is an artist working in New York City. She has released several graphic novels including Xeric Award winner The Blonde Woman, and Impressions. Her sculpture and installation work has been exhibited in Antwerp, Paris, Austin, and Brooklyn.

Parsons Alumni Reception, Friday 2/13

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The School of Art and Design History and Theory and the School of Art, Media, and Technology invite Parsons alumni from all disciplines back to campus for a celebratory alumni reception during the 103rd annual College Art Association Conference.

PARSONS ALUMNI RECEPTION
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13

6:30 – 8:30 pm
Sheila C. Johnson Design Center Lobby
2 West 13th Street
RSVP

Parsons alumni and all conference registrants are also invited to an Agnes Martin roundtable discussion, moderated by Parsons faculty member Karen Schiff, immediately preceding the reception.

For more information, contact us at alumni@newschool.edu or 212.229.5662 x3784.