NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium

The 108th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

hogarth-image

Abigail Zitin on William Hogarth: Narrative Art and Visual Pleasure.

British artist William Hogarth (1697–1763) is, arguably, the ur–graphic novelist, famous above all for pioneering the form of the pictorial narrative series (for instance, in A Harlot’s Progress and The Rake’s Progress). For this reason, his work has always been championed by literary critics, particularly those committed to thinking about textuality across media as well as the development of the novel form in English literature. But in addition to his popular graphic works, Hogarth also published The Analysis of Beauty, an essay whose main arguments often seem at odds with the images for which he is best known. In the Analysis, Hogarth defines beauty abstractly, as an effect of lines and spatial relationships rather than representational content; he has remarkably little to say about storytelling, visual or otherwise. This presentation explores the disconnect between Hogarth’s theory and his reputation as a virtuoso of visual narrative, asking how―and whether―we should reconcile the visual style of by this famously literary artist with the formal principles he seems to have held dear. I approach this question by looking closely at how Hogarth talks about technique: both his careful attention to the mechanical practices of drawing, sculpting, and engraving―even boxing and dancing―and his evident insecurity about expressing his ideas verbally. Hogarth never lets his reader forget that he is not a writer, and this self-consciousness, I argue, should prompt a reexamination of what it might mean to describe him (whether appreciatively or critically) as a literary artist.

Abigail Zitin is Assistant Professor of English at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ and the 2014–15 Carol G. Lederer Postdoctoral Fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University. She studies aesthetics, visual culture, and literary criticism in eighteenth-century Britain; her research focuses on Hogarth’s Analysis of Beauty and the history of formalism. A recent essay on Hogarth’s aesthetics appeared in Eighteenth-Century Studies; another is forthcoming in ELH.

Pop-Up Gallery Show for Beyond the Page

DeathBecomesUs_GalleryShow1Check out the pop-up gallery show featuring projects from this semester’s Beyond the Page class, run by Noël Claro. Along with student work, they will be displaying the results of the collaborative project they did with Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and Universidad Iberoamericana.

BFA Illustration Alumni Featured on Tictail.com

crybaby collective

The Crybaby Collective, an online store that was formed by a group of BFA Illustration alumni, was recently featured on the Tictail blog! Learn more about the group of artists and the Collective here.

Alumni within the Collective include:

Sarah Bibel, Vincy Cheung, Ayline De Wilde, Hannah Drossman, Caelina Eldred-Thielen, Sylvia Jun, Aleen Montchal, Jieshan Ng, Josie Stevenson, Steph Tan, Grace Wagner, Pinky Weber, and Justin Yoon.

 

Alumni of the Week: Hannah Drossman

   Hannah‘s detailed and repetitive mark-making first began in her sketchbooks her freshman year at Parsons when she realized how meditative it was to work that way. Later on in school she started incorporating that kind of drawing into her projects and eventually her thesis.
    Since graduating, Hannah has explored using this technique in different forms, such as sculpture, mixed media and, most recently, very tiny books.
    She also started The Crybaby Collective with her friends and fellow Parsons Illustration 2014 alum. They have an online shop on which they sell products made independently and collaboratively.
*
*
Alumni:Hannah Drossman  Screen Alumni:Hannah Drossman
Alumni: Hannah Drossman

Student of the Week: Anna Outridge

Hailing from Newcastle Australia, Anna has been living and studying in New York for the past three years. Anna’s work is inspired by childhood nostalgia and the appreciation for all things weird and wonderful. Her work is often autobiographical, and she likes to utilise visual story telling as means to process experiences, and understand the world around her.  She is currently part of Meagan Cignoli’s creative team, where she makes short form stop motion animations for a bunch of different brands. In her spare time Anna enjoys spending time with my wiener dog Alfonso, watching B grade reality TV shows and eating grilled cheese.

Visit her website at annaoutridge.com and her instagram @annaout !

Student: Anna OutridgeStudent: Anna Outridge

Line Up Image

Illustration Faculty Steven Guarnaccia to Open Exhibition “Line-Up” in Rome

Line Up ImageIllustration Faculty Member Steven Guarnaccia will be exhibiting his work in Line-Up at the Tricromia Art Gallery in Rome. Learn more about his exhibition below!

Running from November 15 – December 5
Opening Saturday November 18, 2014.
Tricromia Art Gallery Rome, Italy

About the Exhibition: Line-Up is a retrospective exhibition of the illustration work of Steven Guarnaccia. The “line-up” is the classic parade of possible perpetrators before the victim of a crime. Guarnaccia works primarily in line, with pen, ink and watercolor. He is above all interested in how, with a minimum of means, line conveys character, and in turn how character conveys an idea.

Learn more about Steven’s work here.

Illustration Faculty Steven Guarnaccia to Open Exhibition “Line-Up” in Rome

Line Up ImageIllustration Faculty Member Steven Guarnaccia will be exhibiting his work in Line-Up at the Tricromia Art Gallery in Rome. Learn more about his exhibition below!

Running from November 15 – December 5
Opening Saturday November 18, 2014.
Tricromia Art Gallery Rome, Italy

About the Exhibition: Line-Up is a retrospective exhibition of the illustration work of Steven Guarnaccia. The “line-up” is the classic parade of possible perpetrators before the victim of a crime. Guarnaccia works primarily in line, with pen, ink and watercolor. He is above all interested in how, with a minimum of means, line conveys character, and in turn how character conveys an idea.

Learn more about Steven’s work here.

NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium: Hanneriina Moisseinen

hanneriina-moisseinen_father_2The 108th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 8 pm starting time.

Hanneriina Moisseinen will discuss and show her recent work. A trailer for the documentary Lauluhttp://www.tuffifilms.com/documentary

The comic artist Hanneriina Moisseinen (born in Joensuu, Finland in 1978) has an artistic background in fine arts, especially drawing, sculpting and installation, but she has been doing comics since her teenage years.
Moisseinen’s debut album Sen synty (2005) is a collection of illustrated old folktales from the Viena Karelia area. The follow-up, Setit ja partituurit / Sets and Scores (2010), contains more contemporary stories about embarrassing situations in daily life. Isä / Father (2013) tells a real life story how a father of a family disappears with no reason, and is never found again. The themes in her stories are serious, but many times the humor bursts out in unexpected ways.
In the recent years, Moisseinen has been challenging the limits of comic expression by including sewing and embroidery in her work. The technique is slow but produces a strong emotional effect. At the moment she is working on her fourth comic album about cows and other animals in the Second World War.

http://nycomicssymposium.wordpress.com/

NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium

The 108th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Abigail Zitin on William Hogarth: Narrative Art and Visual Pleasure.

unnamed-6

British artist William Hogarth (1697–1763) is, arguably, the ur–graphic novelist, famous above all for pioneering the form of the pictorial narrative series (for instance, in A Harlot’s Progress and The Rake’s Progress). For this reason, his work has always been championed by literary critics, particularly those committed to thinking about textuality across media as well as the development of the novel form in English literature. But in addition to his popular graphic works, Hogarth also published The Analysis of Beauty, an essay whose main arguments often seem at odds with the images for which he is best known. In the Analysis, Hogarth defines beauty abstractly, as an effect of lines and spatial relationships rather than representational content; he has remarkably little to say about storytelling, visual or otherwise. This presentation explores the disconnect between Hogarth’s theory and his reputation as a virtuoso of visual narrative, asking how―and whether―we should reconcile the visual style of by this famously literary artist with the formal principles he seems to have held dear. I approach this question by looking closely at how Hogarth talks about technique: both his careful attention to the mechanical practices of drawing, sculpting, and engraving―even boxing and dancing―and his evident insecurity about expressing his ideas verbally. Hogarth never lets his reader forget that he is not a writer, and this self-consciousness, I argue, should prompt a reexamination of what it might mean to describe him (whether appreciatively or critically) as a literary artist.

Abigail Zitin is Assistant Professor of English at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ and the 2014–15 Carol G. Lederer Postdoctoral Fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University. She studies aesthetics, visual culture, and literary criticism in eighteenth-century Britain; her research focuses on Hogarth’s Analysis of Beauty and the history of formalism. A recent essay on Hogarth’s aesthetics appeared in Eighteenth-Century Studies; another is forthcoming in 

Student of the Week: Allen Robbins

10014907_279130885588871_657559131_o

“Allen Robbins is a Houston, Texas-raised artist. He attended the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts and is now currently pursuing Illustration at Parsons: The New School for Design, in New York City. He has had professional work experience in multiple aspects of design including Illustration and animation. Allen is currently working as a lead designer of the upcoming apparel brand, Wavey Squad, while working as a freelance designer in his spare time. His specialities include character design, t-shirt design, tattoo design, album artwork, poster work, and digital portraits.”

 

 

To see more of Allen’s awesome illustrations, follow him at: facebook.com/allenrobbinsartwork