Akofa Norman

Artist Bio

Akofa Norman is a Togoian artist living and working in Brooklyn. She has worked with deafness and children with autism in special needs education at the St. Francis School for the Deaf for three and a half years. Akofa graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the School of Visual Arts in 2016. She participated in making artwork with other artists, and decided to name their group “DIG”, collaborating together in 2014 at the Firehouse Gallery in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. Working in dialogue motivates her to understand her work as “in progress,” something for viewers to experience and live within. Currently an MFA student at Parsons School of Design in The New School, she is shifting the focus of her work to present a platform for cherishing and a growing space. What matters to her are its impacts and the insights her work inspires.

LOST FOR WORDS

48"x 48"
Textile, acrylic on canvas
2020

BROKEN ANXIETY

48"x 48"
Textile, acrylic on canvas
2020

FRAGILE

48"x 48"
Textile, acrylic on canvas
2020

UNTITLED

48"x 48"
Textile, acrylic on canvas
2020

UNTITLED

48"x 48"
Textile, acrylic on canvas
2020

Artist Statement

My path of discovery is unprecedented. It is a return to, or rather, an emergence of. There was nothing to protect other than my pure parallel self: Who I am, my identity and essence, my heart, my Togolese heritage. As an African woman who is deaf, I have been discovering my psychology in colours and seeing a connection between bodily trauma and anxiety. As an abstract, expressionistic painter, my series of works evoke flesh, as well as all the light our souls cannot see. My paintings express visual poetry of the “female”, composed of various characteristics like soft and rough palettes of neutral colors and bold tones. I create hybrid forms of textile sculptures, paintings and installations. As a woman and as an African, I self-reflect to produce my recreations of the never-to-be- forgotten and/or erased.  I see the self-worth of objects. Discovering textile in painting has opened the floodgates of my personal triggers and storytelling. As my identity changed, so did my art.