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UPDATE on Today’s Free Lecture on Fashionable NanoTech

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UPDATE: Juan Hinestroza is not available to deliver this previously announced talk. Grace Teo will now present at 1:00pm. Grace Teo was invited as part of her involvement with the Wearable Tech group.

Dr. Grace Teo is the co-founder of Open Style Lab. While pursuing her PhD in Health Sciences and Technology at MIT, she received an MIT Public Service Fellowship to establish Open Style Lab. Through multiple partnerships with fashion labels, rehabilitation networks and technology companies, she hopes to bring user-centered and universal design principles into apparel design, and provide a platform for the health and fashion industry to communicate. Grace is originally from Singapore, where she received her B.Eng. at Nanyang Technological University before moving to Boston to complete her Health Sciences and Technology PhD at MIT. She currently holds lecturer appointments in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department and Institute of Medical Engineering and Sciences of MIT.

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Assistant Professor of Fashionable Technology Dr. Sabine Seymour invites Professor Juan Hinestroza from Cornell’s Nanotextile Lab to speak on the topic: Can nanotechnology be fashionable: Merging Fiber Science and apparel Design. The lecture is part of the class The Emerging Convergence of Mobile and Wearable Computing.

February 17 @1PM 

The Orozco Room, Room 712 @ 66 W. 12th St. (7th Fl)
Cotton Nanolayers Nanoparticles- nanotechnology in textiles

Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM images of cotton fibers coated with gold (L) and palladium (R) nanoparticles. Potential applications include catalytic mantles, structural coloration (color without dyes) and antibacterial flexible substrates

Juan P. Hinestroza is a tenured Associate Professor of Fiber Science and directs The Textiles Nanotechnology Laboratory at the College of Human Ecology of Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Professor Hinestroza obtained a Ph.D. from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Tulane University and B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from Universidad Industrial de Santander. Prior to pursuing doctoral studies, Professor Hinestroza worked as a process control engineer for The Dow Chemical Company.

Professor Hinestroza works on understanding fundamental phenomena at the nanoscale that are of relevance to Fiber and Polymer Science. Hinestroza has received over 5.3 MM USD in research funding (Federal and State agencies as well as Industrial Consortiums) for his pioneering work in exploring new pathways for creating multifunctional fibers via manipulation of nanoscale phenomena.

Professor Hinestroza, a US Fulbright Scholar, has been the recipient of a myriad of awards including the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, theJ.D. Watson Young Investigator Award from NYSTAR and the Educator of the Year Award from the Society of Professional Hispanic Engineers. Professor Hinestroza has delivered invited lectures worldwide at Universities and Research Centers in Italy, Korea, China, Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Spain, Brazil, The Netherlands, Colombia, Argentina, Hungary, Czech Republic, Vietnam, Switzerland, Finland, Austria, France, Singapore, Thailand, Chile, Turkey and Germany. In addition, Professor Hinestroza has received visiting scientist fellowships from The Chubu Foundation for Science and Technology of Japan, The National Council for Scientific and Technological Development in Brazil and The Swiss National Science Foundation.

Professor Hinestroza’s scientific work has been featured inNature Nanotechnology, MRS Bulletin, Materials Today, C&E News, National Geographic, ASEE Prism as well as mainstream media outlets such as CNN, Wired, TechReview, The Guardian, Popular Science, ABC News, NYTimes, Reuters, PBS, NPR and BBC. In addition to his scientific endeavors, Professor Hinestroza and his research group are actively involved in community outreach activities aimed at increasing the number of members from underrepresented minority groups in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics as well as engaging senior citizens in collaborative and inter-generational learning experiences.

Acoustic Force Atomic Microscopy image of a conjugated fiber (Islands on the Sea) containing 1120 nanofibers of polyester in a sea of polyethylene (L). Electrostatic Force Microscopy of a  nanofiber nonwoven web used in electret filtration media (R)

Acoustic Force Atomic Microscopy image of a conjugated fiber (Islands on the Sea) containing 1120 nanofibers of polyester in a sea of polyethylene (L). Electrostatic Force Microscopy of a nanofiber nonwoven web used in electret filtration media (R)

TEM and FESEM images of nylon nanofibers coated with gold (L) nanoparticles and anomalous crystal formations of NaCl (R) . Potential applications include active and catalytic filtration of hazardous gases and industrial toxic chemicals as well as anti-counterfeiting devices.

TEM and FESEM images of nylon nanofibers coated with gold (L) nanoparticles and anomalous crystal formations of NaCl (R) . Potential applications include active and catalytic filtration of hazardous gases and industrial toxic chemicals as well as anti-counterfeiting devices.

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