The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents Mohammad Sabaaneh

Mohammad Sabaaneh on The Art of Political Cartooning in Palestine

The Art of Political Cartooning in Palestine
Mohammad will discuss his craft, including his production methods and artistic choices, and his artistic influences and how he navigates the challenges of editorial cartooning in Palestine. He will discuss, accompanied by slides of his work, his own development as an artist and cartoonist – from how he started out, to how his techniques and style evolved over time.

Mohammad Sabaaneh is a Palestinian graphic artist based in Ramallah in the West Bank. He is the principal political cartoonist for Al-Hayat al-Jadida, the Palestinian Authority’s daily newspaper, and has published his work in many other newspapers around the Arab World. He is a member of the International Cartoon Movement, as well as the VJ Movement connecting visual journalists across the globe. Sabaaneh’s work has been displayed in numerous collections and fairs in Europe, the United States, and the Middle East. He won third place in the Arab Caricature Contest in 2013.

A special meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A WEDNESDAY NIGHT EVENT!

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: Patricia Mainardi

Patricia Mainardi: Popular Prints to Comics

 

While popular prints had existed all over Europe for centuries, in the nineteenth-century they evolved into several new genres, including comic strips, children’s literature, and advertising. Subjects for their earliest rural semi-literate audiences, were limited to religion, rulers, crimes and disasters, and homilies, but with advances in printing technology, they began to appeal to an urban and eventually an international audience. These new audiences preferred multi-paneled sheets that abandoned the old verities and instead depicted the whimsical situations typical of modern popular culture in both comic strips and in advertising. This presentation will review the development of popular prints from the earliest examples to comic strips and superheroes.

Patricia Mainardi is an art historian specializing in the 18th and 19th centuries. Her book Another World: Nineteenth-Century European Print Culture was recently published by Yale University Press and discusses the explosion of printed imagery in books, newspapers, comics, and single-sheet images. Previous books include Art and Politics of the Second Empire (Yale University Press, 1987), which was awarded the College Art Association Distinguished Book Award, The End of the Salon (Cambridge University Press, 1983), and Husbands, Wives, and Lovers (Yale University Press, 2003), as well as numerous articles and museum catalogues. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Institute for Advanced Study, the National Gallery of Art and the French Institut national de l’histoire de l’art, and was appointed chevalier (knight) in the Ordre des palmes academiques by the French government. This year she received the College Art Association Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award. She is professor emeritus in the Doctoral Program in Art History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

The 186th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Earth Week: Beyond Polar Bears Presentation

Twister Artwork above: ART©AnaMouyis

Earth Week: Beyond Polar Bears
Presentation and Stipend Awards

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 10:00 am to 11 am
Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, Arnhold Hall, I-202
55 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011

The images will be presented between 10:00 and 11:00 am during the Tishman Environment and Design Center interactive showcase of community-based participatory research led by New School faculty and students addressing the impacts of climate change.

Images will be shared during the first presentation. This is the culmination of a year long project and a great deal of work on your student’s part. If it is at all possible, please excuse this student to join the event, for this hour where faculty grant winners and student scholars will share their research that applies to policy, design, and social justice to address current and future environmental issues generated by the ever-increasing impact of climate change.

Earth Week: “Beyond the Polar Bear” Artwork Exhibition

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 11:00 am to 3:00 pm
Event Café, University Center
63 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

Visit this pop-up exhibition of student, faculty, and alumni work reflecting on the threat of climate change in our lives.

Since its launch in the spring of 2016, Beyond The Polar Bear, a collaboration between The New School and 350.org has captured the imagination of over eighty artists; students, faculty members and alumni from The New School and Parsons School of Design. Of the 142 works submitted, 80 visual expressions are assembled, comprised of gifs, video, memes, diptychs and single images dedicated to interpret the issue of climate change from an intimate perspective. The projected exhibition of works and brief summary of the project will be shared by coordinator and Parsons’ Illustration Assistant Professor, Wendy Popp.

This event is supported by the Tishman Environment and Design Center.

Parsons Student Darius Moreno’s artwork featured on GoldLink’s new album At What Cost

Parsons student Darius Moreno’s artwork has been featured in GoldLink’s newest album At What Cost as the cover artwork as well as the artwork for several singles including “Crew” and “Meditation.” Moreno was recently interviewed by VICE Magazine’s Noisey about his creative process behind the works.  Read the interview here.  The original framed acrylic of Moreno’s GoldLink artwork will be shown at the AMT 2017 End of Year Exhibit.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: Kent Worcester

 

Kent Worcester on Ten Great English Cartoonists You’ve Never Heard Of.

Two years ago Kent Worcester gave a talk on ten great – or at least very good – obscure leftist cartoonists. He returns to the Symposium to present an illustrated lecture on ten witty and engaging English newspaper and magazine cartoonists whose work has been largely or entirely overlooked on this side of the pond.  Kent Worcester is the editor or coeditor of six books on comics and cartoons, including The Comics Studies Reader (2008), The Superhero Reader‘(2013), and, most recently, Silent Agitators: Cartoon Art from the Pages of New Politics (2016). He is a professor of Political Science at Marymount Manhattan College.

The 185th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  April 18, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: John Roman

John Roman on Mapping Thoreau’s World: The Crossroads where Cartooning, Architectural and Technical Art Meet.

John Roman reveals the curious connection between being a cartoonist and his work in the field of “imaginative” mapping. In particular, Roman will discuss the conceptual and aesthetic process behind one of his map assignments: an historically-accurate recreation of Henry David Thoreau’s world (circa 1845).

Cartographic illustrator John Roman is author of the recently-released book, The Art of Illustrated Maps (2015), as well as creator of three nationally-syndicated comic strips (King Features and United Feature Syndicate). Roman is also assistant professor of Illustration at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston.

The 184th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: Blutch

Blutch on A European Education

“I am currently working on a book called Variations (Dargaud, September 2017), where I recreate a series of famous graphic novel sequences by great masters of European comics. This work forces me to ask myself questions regarding the ambiguous nature of sequential art.  Neither literary nor plastic, it is what Harold Rosenberg, referring to painting, once defined as an anxious object. How do we decode it? Where does it stand in our society? A graphic novel can receive a Pulitzer, cartoonists’ work is exhibited in great museums while the art establishment is still indecisive on weather to consider it a minor or a major art. Personally, I call my work ‘paradoxal literature.’  The pages that compose Variations follow each other with no beginning or end. Just fragments of stories that allow me to reach what I feel is hidden somewhere beyond the boundaries of my storytelling: sequential art as a brand new form of poetry. That is, a form of literature ‘to observe.’ Sculpted literature.” – Blutch

 

Born in Strasbourg on 27 December 1967, Christian Hincker, otherwise known as Blutch, obtained a degree in illustration from the Decorative Arts College in his hometown. Later, his drawings embellished the columns of Liberation, New Yorker and Inrockuptibles, a huge sign of success in the industry. But above all, he wanted to produce a graphic chronicle of daily life and its turpitudes. His works resembled thumbnail reports in which the characters of a comic tragedy become bogged down with far-fetched and fantastic digressions in the mirror.
He put his early youthful indiscretions into cartoon form in Fluide Glacial from 1990 onwards and collated them all in one album entitled Waldo’s Bar (Audie, 1992), which was soon to be followed by Mademoiselle Sunnymoon and then Blotch.

While continuing to regularly enrich the contents of these prestigious humorous cartoon-based magazines, he found his way into many small independent publishing houses which were starting to become well-established. The magazine Lapin featured stories which were to become Sunnymoon, tu es malade (Association, 1994). Cornélius published Lettre américaine (1995), followed by the series of booklets entitled Mitchum.
His contribution to the monthly A Suivre in 1996 marked the recognition of his very specific style, demonstrated in a powerful black and white production. In this, he presented a large section of Peplum, a homosexual tragedy based on Satiricon by Petrone, the uncut version of which was presented by Cornélius in 1997 (published in English by New York Review Comics, 2016). From that moment on, Blutch never hesitated to tackle controversial subjects.

In 1998, he produced Rancho Bravo for Audie, in collaboration with Capron. At Editions du Seuil publishing house, he illustrated texts by Hortense Dufour (Charivari, Melle Noémie), H. M. Enzensberger (Les Sept voyages de Pierre) and Fabio Viscogliosi (Le Pacha). His work was also to be found in Alain Beaulet publications (Le Cavalier blanc, n°2), as well as La Présidente, with J. C. Menu, in the collection Noire est la Terre and Brüsel (Piccoli).
After systematically using all black-and-white resources, Blutch adapted his expressionist work so as to profit from the support of the colorist Ruby in Vitesse moderne (Dupuis 2002, Europe Comics in English in 2017), exploring an almost fanciful Paris, haunted by stray creatures and shadows which you could swear were real even though they were only part of this unclassifiable creator’s fantasy.

Blutch collaborated with Jazzman magazine from 2000 to 2004, which resulted in the creation of Total Jazz (Cornélius). For Futuropois he wrote Bonheur, Volupté and Beauté between 2005 and 2008. He also worked with Alain Resnais (posters, graphics) and occasionally took on acting in a number of films.
In 2011 he released Pour en finir avec le cinema with Dargaud (So Long Sivler Screen, PictureBox 2014, Europe Comics 2017).
In 2014 Blutch released the totally surreal Lune l’envers (Dargaud 2014, Europe Comics 2017), which deals with an author suffering from writer’s block, buckling under the weight of self-doubt and daily responsibilities.

Playful, surreal and poignant, Blutch is undoubtedly one of the most prolific and challenging authors of our time.

The 183rd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).

Free and open to the public.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: Will Eisner

Jules Feiffer Honors Will Eisner at 100.
A Will Eisner Week Event
with Paul Levitz & Danny Fingeroth

[Jules Feiffer will appear live via Skype.]

Will Eisner (1917-2005) innovated and pioneered comics in two different eras. Eisner helped invent the comics industry in the 1930s and created The Spirit in the 1940s as a heroic crime-fighting figure who appeared in a Sunday newspaper comics insert. The Spirit walked through a world of noir-inflected, urban drama, one suffused with humor and insight into the human condition, a world not afraid to essay the occasional Yiddish in-joke or Bronx social drama vignette.  Then after producing comics for training and education, Eisner, in 1978, re-invented himself―and the medium of comics―with his first graphic novel, A Contract With God, followed, until his 2005 passing, with many additional graphic novels and textbooks.

From 1946 until The Spirit’s end in 1952, Eisner counted as part of his close-knit, talented staff, a precocious teenager named Jules Feiffer, who worked on The Spirit and Clifford for Eisner, and also took on the self-appointed role of Eisner’s social conscience and resident smart-ass. In the years since, Feiffer’s own multifaceted career as satirical cartoonist, screenwriter (Carnal Knowledge), playwright (Little Murders) and children’s book author (The Man in the Ceiling)―and most recently, creator of his own trilogy of graphic novels (so far Kill My Mother and Cousin Joseph have been released, with the third volume in the works)―has blossomed in a unique and spectacular manner. But he did get his start with Will Eisner, with whom he was friend and colleague―and admirer―through the rest of Eisner’s life.

Jules will speak about his experience working for Eisner, what he learned from him and how Eisner influenced his own work, and why Eisner, a century after his birth, is still an important figure in the past, present and future of comics and graphic novels and in our culture as a whole.

Jules will speak and present via Skype, and will be joined by in-person panelists, including Paul Levitz (author of Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel) and Danny Fingeroth (co-editor of The Stan Lee Universe and Chair of Will Eisner Week).

The 182nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 at 8pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).

Free and open to the public.