Category Archives: Parsons

Special Events for Alumni/Students of Color: 10/21 Community Brunch, 10/26 Portfolio Review, 10/27 Exhibition Closing Reception

(under)REPRESENT(ed) Community Brunch
Saturday, October 21 from 11am-2pm
6 East 16th Street, Wolff Conference Room 1103

Alumni of color and Students of color are invited to break bread, reflect and strategize around experiences of race and identity at Parsons and within creative industries.

Please RSVP: tinyurl.com/underrepresentedbrunch

 
Fb event:
 
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(under)REPRESENT(ed) Portfolio Reviews
Thursday, October 26 from 6-8pm
Starr Foundation Hall- 63 Fifth Ave (UC), Lower level
Students of color are invited to receive critical feedback on work that addresses race and identity from alumni of color.
 
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(under)REPRESENT(ed) Closing
Friday, October 27 at 6 PM – 8 PM
66 Fifth Avenue, Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries
Exhibiting alumni reflect on their work. Open to the public.
 
For more information, visit: underrepresented.parsons.edu or email us at underrepresented@newschool.edu

(under)REPRESENT(ed) to Open at Sheila C. Design Center

October 17, 6-8 PM

Sheila C. Design Center, Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries

66 5th Ave, Ground Floor

New York, NY 10003

Closing reception with artist talk: October 27th, 6-8pm

(under)REPRESENT(ed) is an exhibition that features Parsons School of Design alumni of color whose creative practices explore the lived experience of race and aim to dismantle systems of racism.  Initiated and organized by a collective of alumni of color, this exhibition features a range of disciplines which simultaneously address and resist the systemic exclusion that prevails in educational and professional institutions and practices.

A video from a digital and physical archive that affirms the future of people of African descent; a design research project lessens the impact of hurricane season on one alum’s hometown in the Dominican Republic; a children’s book fable reveals an allegory of the dangerous journey migrants often face to enter the United States; an online syllabus resource explores the intersections of fashion and race; photographs reflect on the historic status symbol and power of hair in Korean culture, which resonates in communities across the globe; and a multimedia project promotes citizen journalism and challenges the normalization of police violence.

“We are moved by an urgency to foreground the power generated by creative practices,” said the curators of the exhibition.  “Our own experience as students, practicing artists, designers, educators and cultural organizers tells us that this work isn’t always given its due criticism or celebration in the classroom and other institutional spaces.”

People of color have been pioneers in fields of art and design, although they  continue to be significantly underrepresented in positions of power and compensation.  Despite the rich foundational contributions by Black, Latinx, Asian, and Indigenous communities to these industries,  they are often rendered invisible.  The curators of this exhibition stake a claim for the centrality of those most deeply impacted by these oppressive frameworks in an era which challenges our existing tools of resistance.

The Parsons alumni featured in the exhibition are (AMT Alums in bold):

Salome Asega, MFA Design and Technology ’14 
Rikki Byrd, MA Fashion Studies ’16
Raquel de Anda, MS Design and Urban Ecologies ’15
Nelson de Jesus Ubri, BFA Architectural Design ’15
Patricia Encarnación, BFA Communication Design ’14 
Noelle Flores Théard, MFA Photography ’14 
Scherezade Garcia, BFA Illustration ’90 
Alston Green, CGRD Illustration ’72 
Kim Jenkins, MA Fashion Studies ’13
Leslie Jimenez, BFA Fine Arts ’12 
Sara Jimenez, MFA Fine Arts ’13 
Yuni Kim Lang, BFA Communication Design ’09 
Jeana Lindo, BFA Photography ’17 
Joy McKinney, MFA Photography ’14 
Joiri Minaya, BFA Fine Arts ’13 
Ron Morrison, MS Design and Urban Ecologies ’15
Inyegumena Nosegbe, BFA Communication Design ’16 
Ayodamola Okunseinde, MFA Design and Technology ’15 
Isaac Paris, BFA Communication Design ’78 
Kaitlynn Redell, MFA Fine Arts ’13 
Jeff Staple, Illustration 
Ken Tanabe, MFA Design and Technology ’04 
James Terrell, MFA Painting ’02 
Duncan Tonatiuh, BFA Integrated Design Curriculum ’08, BA Liberal Arts ’08
Robert Liu-Trujillo, BFA Illustration ’10 
Christopher Udemezue, BFA Integrated Design Curriculum ’08

Organized by a collective of Parsons Alumni of Color

Havanna Fisher, BFA Fashion Design ’14, BA The Arts ’14 
Scherezade García, BFA Illustration ’90 
Joelle Riffle, BFA Communication Design ’13 
Yelaine Rodríguez, BFA Fashion Design ’13
Sable Elyse Smith, MFA Design and Technology ’13 
Nadia Williams, BFA Fashion Design ’01 
(under)REPRESENT(ed) equity + social justice advisor: Gail Drakes
(under)REPRESENT(ed) research assistant: Claudine Brantley, BFA Candidate of Photography ’18
(under)REPRESENT(ed) research assistant: Barbara Byrd, BFA Fine Arts ’17

Contact us at underrepresented@newschool.edu

The exhibition will run from October 14, when an opening reception for Parsons alumni will be held, until October 29.

More info here.

Interview with artist, Sue Coe

New School student, Tracy Fernandez, interviews artist Sue Coe in anticipation of her lecture on Tuesday Oct. 3rd, part of the NY Comic and Picture Story Symposium , and in anticipation of her exhibition, “All Good Art is Political” with Käthe Kollwitz at the Galerie St. Etienne, part of New York Print Week (October 23rd – October 29th).

Sue Coe’s NYCPSS lecture will be for her new, all-picture book, “The Animals’ Vegan Manifesto.” 

FERNANDEZ: What medium do you prefer to work in? Why?

COE: I prefer pencil then woodcut then litho.  I prefer to draw as if it were painting and cut wood like a drawing. It’s elegant and simple.

The Veal Skinner, 1991. Stone lithograph.

FERNANDEZ: What do animals mean to you? How did your experience living near a slaughterhouse shape that meaning?

COE: The injustice of the way animals are bred to be slaughtered is intolerable. The pain animals feel is more than they can bear. The meat industry has exponentially become increasingly psychotic, murdering trillions of animals every year and devastating wildlife, human health, and the planet. Animal liberation is a social justice movement, like any other, it demands an end of all animal use. Slaughterhouses are concealed from most people, but in my childhood, the slaughterhouse was my house.

FERNANDEZ: In order to create graphic, violent imagery of animal cruelty, did you rely on visiting slaughterhouses or mostly work from memory?

COE: The imagery is the reflection of reality drawn to create change. Many of the scenes I have witnessed directly. Some I have not drawn at all, yet. As Beckmann said about being in the trenches of WW1 – my art eats here.

FERNANDEZ: As an illustrator who works in multiple mediums, what techniques do you use specifically to communicate these graphic scenes to an audience?

COE: When I started out as an illustrator there was little color in mass media publications, so I was trained to stay within black and white, and used tone to suggest color. I rarely work for commercial publications any more, as create my own words and images.  I lean toward sequential reportage work. I invented my own art world, within the art world, but stay within the concept  that technique is the test of sincerity. My gallery and my frequent book publisher are extremely supportive.

Sue Coe, Red Slaughterhouse, 1988. Excerpted from Cruel, page 71.

Butcher to the World, 1986. Excerpted from Cruel, page 20.

FERNANDEZ: Would you consider your artworks to be a form of activism? If so, what does it mean to you to be an activist/protester?

COE: I do consider art and activism to be one and the same.   If people are not protesting by now, they are not paying attention.  The crime is indifference.  I can raise money for different non profits selling cheap prints, people get ‘art’ and the pleasure of knowing they are helping. Anyone can do this.

FERNANDEZ: With your artwork regarding animal cruelty and human injustice, what impact do you intend to have on an audience?

COE: I believe in truth based activism. Deteriorating social conditions create the resistance, as well as embolden the extreme right. We are the audience (now defined as product) witnessing the crime of corporate greed and destruction of life. How that impacts me personally, is making the art which slows time down long enough to resist.

FERNANDEZ: In the height of political chaos, what role do you feel that art and design hold in relation to politics?

COE: Art and design, if it is linked to mass struggle can be highly effective. You can’t have a political art uncoupled from political struggle. The ruling class are attempting to silence dissent, by blaming the victims. It’s the oldest trick in the book, along with divide and conquer. Art is a positive non-violent way people can speak to each other across walls and borders.

 

Wall Street Walk by Sue Coe, 2012.
2 Color Lithograph
36”x26”

Sue Coe’s work, Wall Street Walk, which she made in the Print Shop at Parsons and is now part of The New School Art Collection, details in the video below where the terms “wall street” and “stock market” originate from.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents Anna O’Meara

Anna O’Meara – Ja ja ja!: Isidore Isou on destroying words and pictures for their realization

The cinema is where words meet moving images in a continuum. Films seamlessly merge music, dialogue, narrative, and images. In 1951, Isidore Isou made a violent attempt to break film’s seamless continuum in Treatise on Drool and Eternity. An inspiration to filmmakers like Stan Brakage and Guy Debord, Isou’s film manifesto was a precursor to both American and French avant-garde art and politics. After working on a new translation of Isou’s film for Annex Press, I will discuss Isou’s methods in breaking traditional art forms in order to create new aesthetic and ideological standards. This discussion will use texts by Isou, many of which are untranslated, that wrestle with the creation of new forms through the deconstruction and reconstruction – through the merging and breaking – of the relationship between text and image in film.

Anna O’Meara is a French to English translator and historian based in Albany, NY. Her translations include a forthcoming publication with Annex Press of Isidore Isou’s Treatise on Drool and Eternity in partnership with translators Ian Thompson of Brisbane, Australia and Nadège LeJeune of Paris, France. She has also translated The Works of Arthur Cravan, which has appeared in Maintenant by Three Rooms Press. O’Meara received her M.A. in Art History from the University of Notre Dame in 2013 for which she wrote The Marxist Critique of Religion in the Films of Guy Debord. Currently, she serves as a Research Assistant to the New York State Historian, Devin Lander. O’Meara has conducted branding research and website development for a New York City production firm, Archivist Media, as well as exhibit development research for the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Previously, she served as the Director of Outreach & Development for the Museum Association of New York, and the Assistant Administrator of the Albany County Historical Association.

The 187th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).

Free and open to the public.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: Patricia Mainardi

Patricia Mainardi: Popular Prints to Comics

 

While popular prints had existed all over Europe for centuries, in the nineteenth-century they evolved into several new genres, including comic strips, children’s literature, and advertising. Subjects for their earliest rural semi-literate audiences, were limited to religion, rulers, crimes and disasters, and homilies, but with advances in printing technology, they began to appeal to an urban and eventually an international audience. These new audiences preferred multi-paneled sheets that abandoned the old verities and instead depicted the whimsical situations typical of modern popular culture in both comic strips and in advertising. This presentation will review the development of popular prints from the earliest examples to comic strips and superheroes.

Patricia Mainardi is an art historian specializing in the 18th and 19th centuries. Her book Another World: Nineteenth-Century European Print Culture was recently published by Yale University Press and discusses the explosion of printed imagery in books, newspapers, comics, and single-sheet images. Previous books include Art and Politics of the Second Empire (Yale University Press, 1987), which was awarded the College Art Association Distinguished Book Award, The End of the Salon (Cambridge University Press, 1983), and Husbands, Wives, and Lovers (Yale University Press, 2003), as well as numerous articles and museum catalogues. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Institute for Advanced Study, the National Gallery of Art and the French Institut national de l’histoire de l’art, and was appointed chevalier (knight) in the Ordre des palmes academiques by the French government. This year she received the College Art Association Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award. She is professor emeritus in the Doctoral Program in Art History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

The 186th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Earth Week: Beyond Polar Bears Presentation

Twister Artwork above: ART©AnaMouyis

Earth Week: Beyond Polar Bears
Presentation and Stipend Awards

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 10:00 am to 11 am
Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, Arnhold Hall, I-202
55 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011

The images will be presented between 10:00 and 11:00 am during the Tishman Environment and Design Center interactive showcase of community-based participatory research led by New School faculty and students addressing the impacts of climate change.

Images will be shared during the first presentation. This is the culmination of a year long project and a great deal of work on your student’s part. If it is at all possible, please excuse this student to join the event, for this hour where faculty grant winners and student scholars will share their research that applies to policy, design, and social justice to address current and future environmental issues generated by the ever-increasing impact of climate change.

Earth Week: “Beyond the Polar Bear” Artwork Exhibition

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 11:00 am to 3:00 pm
Event Café, University Center
63 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10003

Visit this pop-up exhibition of student, faculty, and alumni work reflecting on the threat of climate change in our lives.

Since its launch in the spring of 2016, Beyond The Polar Bear, a collaboration between The New School and 350.org has captured the imagination of over eighty artists; students, faculty members and alumni from The New School and Parsons School of Design. Of the 142 works submitted, 80 visual expressions are assembled, comprised of gifs, video, memes, diptychs and single images dedicated to interpret the issue of climate change from an intimate perspective. The projected exhibition of works and brief summary of the project will be shared by coordinator and Parsons’ Illustration Assistant Professor, Wendy Popp.

This event is supported by the Tishman Environment and Design Center.

Parsons Student Darius Moreno’s artwork featured on GoldLink’s new album At What Cost

Parsons student Darius Moreno’s artwork has been featured in GoldLink’s newest album At What Cost as the cover artwork as well as the artwork for several singles including “Crew” and “Meditation.” Moreno was recently interviewed by VICE Magazine’s Noisey about his creative process behind the works.  Read the interview here.  The original framed acrylic of Moreno’s GoldLink artwork will be shown at the AMT 2017 End of Year Exhibit.

The New York Comics & Picture-story Symposium Presents: John Roman

John Roman on Mapping Thoreau’s World: The Crossroads where Cartooning, Architectural and Technical Art Meet.

John Roman reveals the curious connection between being a cartoonist and his work in the field of “imaginative” mapping. In particular, Roman will discuss the conceptual and aesthetic process behind one of his map assignments: an historically-accurate recreation of Henry David Thoreau’s world (circa 1845).

Cartographic illustrator John Roman is author of the recently-released book, The Art of Illustrated Maps (2015), as well as creator of three nationally-syndicated comic strips (King Features and United Feature Syndicate). Roman is also assistant professor of Illustration at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston.

The 184th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.