The Pedagogy of Design in the Age of Computation | December 7

Parsons Communication Design Symposium:
The Pedagogy of Design in the Age of Computation
December 7, 2018, 1–5 PM
Parsons School of Design
63 5th Ave., Rm. UL 102, NYC

Open to Public – Please RSVP

Over the last twenty years, design education has had an evolving but uneasy relationship with code. Graphic and communication design programs in the late 1990s were already struggling with the idea that designers would use computers to design, so the idea that students could be taught to code—or should be taught to code—was deferred indefinitely. In the meantime, dozens of adjacent programs in new media and creative technologies sprung up to fill the gap, with many designers and artists finding their first experiences with code in those programs, while other designers elected to learn on their own, or not at all.

Twenty years later, it’s still an open question how, or whether, the surging number of students studying graphic and communication design should learn to code. Despite the increasing “program or be programmed” urgency in contemporary culture, there are new challenges. Computer interfaces are increasingly opaque, dampening both understanding and curiosity. Students pressured into narrow definitions of “career” struggle to find relevance in learning methods, techniques, and theory that don’t fit neatly into specific job titles, and even the embrace of “digital design” has taken a turn towards prototyping rather than designing digital experiences. As a result, there have been many innovations in teaching code in K-12 environments, or to artists, but learning to code is still seen as alien to the design context, even if it is nothing new.

In this symposium, we bring together designers, programmers, and educators to unpack their approaches and philosophies towards code and pedagogy in design. How did we get here and where do we go from here? What do we owe to the students?

https://parsons.github.io/pedagogy-of-design-in-the-age-of-computation/

Panelists
Atıf Akın, Associate Professor in Design at Rutgers University
Taeyoon Choi, Co-founder, School for Poetic Computation
Rik Lomas, Founder and CEO, SuperHi
Mindy Seu, Fellow, Berkman Klein Center for the Internet and Society

Moderated by
Juliette Cezzar, Assistant Professor of Communication Design at Parsons

Student Presenters
Rijk van Zanten, MPS Communication Design
Jack Rieger, BFA Communication Design

Organized by
E Roon Kang, Director, BFA Communication Design
Brendan Griffiths, Director, MPS Communication Design

Poster Design by
Katherine Leisy

Sanchi Oberoi, AAS Graphic Design, wins the Graphic Design USA Competition

 

Sanchi Oberoi is currently in her final semester of the AAS Graphic Design program. Prior to moving to New York a little more than a year ago, she received a degree in Philosophy from Lady Shri Ram College for Women in her hometown New Delhi, India. Studying Philosophy and then shifting her focus to graphic design allowed her to think differently and make her design work more conceptual and thought out and also helped her understand that design is much more than making something look pretty. Apart from design, she is obsessed with R&B and Electronic music, traveling (twenty-one countries and counting) and finding hidden food gems in New York City. Sanchi has won the Graphic Design USA Competition for her project Nitro.

 

The Nitro app. It is an all encompassing app where users can make payments, see Nitro energy station locations, get directions, compare their usage with conventional fuel usage and see how much they contributed to sustainability with EcoMeter, get help & support and more.

Nitro is a fictional collective of emerging companies that have banded together to offer service stations that are a one-stop location where an electric car can be plugged in, a nitro battery operated car can get a replacement and biofuel cars can be serviced.  After significant research and analysis, she came up with three brand values that helped her structure her entire brand design. These were Convenience, Futuristic & Environment-Friendly. 

 

The Landing page advertising the Nitro App.

What were your favorite classes at Parsons?
My favorite classes at Parsons were Typography I, Motion Graphics and Graphic Design I, II & III. These are the classes I had the most fun in. I believe that if I don’t get excited about the prospect of designing something or don’t enjoy the process of designing, I can never create something good.

 

Nitro stationery- I wanted to contrast the minimalist and clean look of the futuristic brand with a bright and roaring orange to emphasize the “energy” and “power” aspect of the brand. I don’t want users to [confuse]d sustainability with lower quality or sub-par performance.

Nitro Brochure- Topics like sustainability and alternative energy sources can tend to get too theoretical and esoteric therefore I wanted to make the brochure as simple and easy to read as possible. I created illustrations to explain what features the energy stations have and explained the visions and goals of the brand in a clear and concise manner, focusing on the typography so that it is all easy to read.

Who do you look up to in the design community?
There are so many great designers whose work I admire but one designer that I really look up to is Tibor Kalman. I admire how he took risks and designed in a clever way. He didn’t focus on embellishing his designs but rather focused on visualizing a strong concept that people can relate to.

 

Want to know more about Sanchi Oberoi? 

Website | Instagram

 

MEET THE MODERNS: Midcentury American Graphic Design

AIGA NY @ Parsons Lecture Series Presents:

Meet The Moderns: Midcentury American Graphic Design

Monday, November 20, 2017 AT 6:30PM-8:30PM
John L. Tishman Auditorium, University Center
63 Fifth Avenue, Room U100, New York, NY 10003

 

Modernism transformed American graphic design in the mid-twentieth century and established a visual language that still carries tremendous authority. The Moderns: Midcentury American Graphic Design by Steven Heller and Greg D’Onofrio (Abrams Books, 2017) is the first comprehensive survey of this phenomenon, showcasing sixty-three graphic designers. Some were émigrés (including five Bauhaus students and faculty) who brought the gospel of Modernism to America from its sources in Europe. Others were homegrown talents who encountered Modernism in schools and studios at home and abroad. They formed a multigenerational community, learning from one another and forging individual practices through engagement with the esthetics of the movement.

The Moderns focuses on the principals and disciples who continued the Modern legacy in the design capitals of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles from around 1937 with the founding of the New Bauhaus to 1970, the height of the International Typographic Style. Like Modernism itself, the designers included had varying methods yet were bound by governing principles of function, clarity, and simplicity. Some of these designers are well-known, others are celebrated in this volume for the first time.

Introduction by Debbie Millman.

This evening includes a talk by the authors and panel with some of the designers and a book signing.

Learn more about the event’s speakers here!

FREE: must be signed into The New School gmail account to register.

Presented by AIGA NY and Parsons School of Art, Media and Technology

Special Events for Alumni/Students of Color: 10/21 Community Brunch, 10/26 Portfolio Review, 10/27 Exhibition Closing Reception

(under)REPRESENT(ed) Community Brunch
Saturday, October 21 from 11am-2pm
6 East 16th Street, Wolff Conference Room 1103

Alumni of color and Students of color are invited to break bread, reflect and strategize around experiences of race and identity at Parsons and within creative industries.

Please RSVP: tinyurl.com/underrepresentedbrunch

 
Fb event:
 
……………………………..
(under)REPRESENT(ed) Portfolio Reviews
Thursday, October 26 from 6-8pm
Starr Foundation Hall- 63 Fifth Ave (UC), Lower level
Students of color are invited to receive critical feedback on work that addresses race and identity from alumni of color.
 
 ……………………………..
(under)REPRESENT(ed) Closing
Friday, October 27 at 6 PM – 8 PM
66 Fifth Avenue, Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries
Exhibiting alumni reflect on their work. Open to the public.
 
For more information, visit: underrepresented.parsons.edu or email us at underrepresented@newschool.edu

Avery Youngblood, AAS Graphic Design ’18, Wins Beyonce’s Formation Scholarship

Upon its release, Lemonade, Beyonce’s sixth album, was hailed as an incisive piece of social commentary exploring love, infidelity, race, power and oppression. A cultural and commercial juggernaut, it spawned a stunning “visual album” that premiered on HBO, a world tour, and 12 singles that appeared on the Billboard 100 charts.

In honor of the one-year anniversary of the album’s release, Beyonce earlier this year announced the Formation Scholarship, a one-time $25,000 scholarship to be awarded to one student each from Parsons School of Design, Berklee School of Music, Howard University, and Spelman College.

Avery Youngblood, AAS Graphic Design ’18, was recently announced as the Parsons winner of the scholarship for her work that promotes activism through bold, creative methods. The leading art and design school also awarded $5,000 to each of the scholarship’s four finalists: Leah Takele, MFA Design and Technology ‘18; Bailey Hardaway, BFA Fashion Design ‘19; Olufunmilayo Bright, MFA Fine Arts ‘18; Caroline Macfarlane, MS Design and Urban Ecologies ’18.

“I hope to pursue my goals as the woman that Beyonce looked for in a scholar, which is to be bold, unique, creative, and think outside the box,” Youngblood says.

Avery Youngblood, AAS Graphic Design ’18 Youngblood was one of four recipients of Beyonce’s Formation Scholarship, winning $25,000 for her work that explores activism through bold, creative methods. Photo by Diego Ledezma-Perez, BFA Photography ’18

 

Youngblood, who previously studied Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Linguistics at Stanford, uses graphic design as a tool for activism. As the head of the political action committee for Stanford’s Black Student Union, she helped coordinate Black Women’s History Month on campus.

“Linguistics has allowed me to analyze the language of prejudices and discrimination that limits and surrounds communities that face discrimination, and then I attempt to represent those in the creative form with design,” says Youngblood. “Parsons has taught me that every aspect of design, however subtle or nuanced, plays a crucial role in communicating messages.”

After seeing Lemonade, Youngblood was inspired to pursue activism through art.

“I want my designs to cross boundaries from the self, to voicing a perspective from the ‘other,’” says Youngblood. “That voice is all too often unheard, misunderstood, or misrepresented in the broader social realm.”

(Repost from The New School News)

“Colin Kaepernick Kneeling” – Youngblood was inspired to create this postage stamp by the revolutionary kneel that quarterback Colin Kaepernick took before the national anthem, which helped change the dynamic of sports and race forever.

Self-Portrait: Youngblood is interested in the social interactions that take place in our multicultural society, and the variety of platforms we connect with each other on. Her work aims to move beyond boundaries, and represent the diversifying voices of our social world.

“How to be Black” – Youngblood created this how-to manual not to tell others how to be black, but to offer her perspective on what living in colored skin has taught her about the world.

“How to be Black” – Youngblood’s manual includes historical facts about Black people throughout history, as well as an interactive feature that lets people “rainbow-fy” the illustration of a black woman in the accordion fold-out.

Know Your Rights: IP Lecture Series Spring 2017

Graphic Design and Publications Fellowship | Socrates Sculpture Park

 

Graphic Design and Publications Fellowship—Socrates Sculpture Park

Requirements: Socrates Sculpture Park is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student in Graphic Design with a strong interest in contemporary art. The ideal candidate will have knowledge of In Design, printing methods, strong organizational skills, and an interest in contemporary art, and ideally past experience working in a gallery or non-for-profit.

Responsibilities: Interns gain experience in contemporary art design and publishing. The intern will primarily be responsible for the design of the park’s digital and print publications for two of its major exhibitions; the annual Emerging Artist Fellowship Program, and the Spring/Summer exhibition, opening May 2017. In addition to design, this includes facilitating file exchange with printers and uploads to the website, collecting and sorting images, captioning, and securing reproductions rights. Other responsibilities may include design edits of existing e-publications, interpretive materials and way-finding design, special event and programming design, and occasional PDF website content design.

Skills: InDesign, Photoshop Starting and ending dates: December 1, 2015–June 30, 2015 (flexibility allowed depending on fellow’s schedule)

Work schedule: 7-10 hours per week, approximately 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Interns will come to the office once a week. Some work may be performed off-site for flexible schedule. Fellows will not work during winter holidays.

Compensation: $2,000 stipend

To apply: Send a resume and cover letter to Jess Wilcox at Jw@socratessculpturepark.org.

ABOUT

Socrates Sculpture Park has been a model of public art production, community activism, and socially inspired place-making for more than 30 years. Known for fostering ambitious and visionary artworks, Socrates has presented more than 1,000 artists on its five waterfront acres, providing them the financial support, materials, equipment, and space necessary to create large-scale works in the public realm. Open 365 days a year from dawn till dusk, the park is a center of cultural programming, as a producer of contemporary exhibitions, a presenter of a multi-disciplinary performance series, and an educator of more than 10,000 children and teens each year – all free. The Park’s existence is based on the belief that reclamation, revitalization and creative expression are essential to the survival, humanity and improvement of our urban environment. www.socratessculpturepark.org

Graphic Design and Publications Fellowship | Socrates Sculpture Park

 

Graphic Design and Publications Fellowship—Socrates Sculpture Park

Requirements: Socrates Sculpture Park is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student in Graphic Design with a strong interest in contemporary art. The ideal candidate will have knowledge of In Design, printing methods, strong organizational skills, and an interest in contemporary art, and ideally past experience working in a gallery or non-for-profit.

Responsibilities: Interns gain experience in contemporary art design and publishing. The intern will primarily be responsible for the design of the park’s digital and print publications for two of its major exhibitions; the annual Emerging Artist Fellowship Program, and the Spring/Summer exhibition, opening May 2017. In addition to design, this includes facilitating file exchange with printers and uploads to the website, collecting and sorting images, captioning, and securing reproductions rights. Other responsibilities may include design edits of existing e-publications, interpretive materials and way-finding design, special event and programming design, and occasional PDF website content design.

Skills: InDesign, Photoshop Starting and ending dates: December 1, 2015–June 30, 2015 (flexibility allowed depending on fellow’s schedule)

Work schedule: 7-10 hours per week, approximately 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Interns will come to the office once a week. Some work may be performed off-site for flexible schedule. Fellows will not work during winter holidays.

Compensation: $2,000 stipend

To apply: Send a resume and cover letter to Jess Wilcox at Jw@socratessculpturepark.org.

ABOUT

Socrates Sculpture Park has been a model of public art production, community activism, and socially inspired place-making for more than 30 years. Known for fostering ambitious and visionary artworks, Socrates has presented more than 1,000 artists on its five waterfront acres, providing them the financial support, materials, equipment, and space necessary to create large-scale works in the public realm. Open 365 days a year from dawn till dusk, the park is a center of cultural programming, as a producer of contemporary exhibitions, a presenter of a multi-disciplinary performance series, and an educator of more than 10,000 children and teens each year – all free. The Park’s existence is based on the belief that reclamation, revitalization and creative expression are essential to the survival, humanity and improvement of our urban environment. www.socratessculpturepark.org

Graphic Design Book – Color Theory: Living in Color

Color Theory: Living in Color

Color is a silent language we all know how to speak. What is Color Theory — the mixtures and implementation of color. What is color — Hue, Value, and Chroma. Why do we use something like a Color Wheel, it’s a tool that helps us talk about the physical phenomena of light, how we perceive it and ultimately utilize it in design. A tool … a tool to help us communicate.

– Thomas Basket

Featuring work by Sari Park & Fernanda Canellas Silva.

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Graphic Design Book – Graphic Design & Silkscreen

Graphic Design and Silkscreen

Every color used is made by hand and every print is prepared, then pulled, layer by layer in a studio environment. The Parsons AAS Graphic Design & Silkscreen class is to connect high-level design thinking with the formal elements of both page layout and silkscreen printmaking. So that, as a student, in thinking about the medium you are using, you are also understanding more about what makes a strong design and what makes strong design thinking.

 

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