Leonie Cicirello | Parsons Fine Arts - 2019 BFA Thesis Exhibition

Peru, 1985
leoniecicirello.com

"Untitled," 2016, video

Video and audio interact by not by telling a story or creating a metaphor. Instead the work aims to achieve a sort of oxymoronic mood, a painfully attractive portrayal of depression. Again and again, leaving the viewer orphaned with a mix of conflicting feelings and thoughts.

"Untitled," 2016, video

"Untitled," 2015, 3 channel video (no sound), 2:10

Zoloft is an antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may be unbalanced in people with depression, panic, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

"Untitled," 2015, 3 channel video (no sound), 2:10

Artist Statement

Leonie’s work to date touches on topics closely related to her personal struggles as a clinically depressed individual. Examining the ambiguity and origination of ‘depression’ not only as mental illness, but as a term with many definitions. She attempts to approach the wide scale of the ‘depressive-affect’ in a multi-layered way. The work never shows the complete structure, dreamlike images in which fiction and the reality of the everyday meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. They are an investigation into representations of (seemingly) concrete situations as well as depictions and ideas.
There is a tranquil poetic quality in the work that balances on the edge of recognition and evokes alienation. It directly responds to her surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that would go unnoticed in their original context. By taking daily life as subject matter while commenting on the everyday aesthetic of observation Leonie tries to increase the dynamic between audience and author by objectifying emotions and investigating the duality that develops through different interpretations.

Artist Bio

Leonie is a graphic designer, photographer and video artist. Her works to date touches on topics closely related to her personal struggles as a clinically depressed individual. She examines the ambiguity and origination of ‘depression’ not only as mental illness, but as a term with many definitions. In this manner she attempts to approach the wide scale of the ‘depressive-affect’ in a multi-layered way. The work never shows the complete structure. The realities of the everyday meet, well-known tropes merge, meanings shift, past and present fuse. These are an investigation into representations of (seemingly) concrete situations.