Parsons

Photo Faculty Colin Stearns’ Meridian Named One of the Best Photobooks of 2016 by photo-eye

BFA Photo Director Colin Stearns’ photobook Meridian named by photo-eye as one of the Best Photo Books of 2016.

Sarah Bradley writes:

Meridian is quiet and understated, straightforward in layout and small in scale but makes good use of those modest assets. It’s smartly designed. Intimately sized images appear and occasionally repeat, scenes are sometimes viewed from slightly different angles, sometimes printed lightly, making one unsure if the image is really there or if one is seeing the ghost of the photo on the reverse bleeding through. Images fade in and out. A figure appears on one page and then again on the following, but loosing distinction. Suddenly one becomes aware of the shadow of the image through the paper. The photographs move from coastal spaces to verdant ones to concrete and back again, but for me this book isn’t so much about that visual content. Images seem correlated with thought and feeling, the book unwrapping stream of consciousness style to reveal a solitary and heady place. I know this space well; I am often here – but never actually here. Stearns’ voice is well articulated and his Meridian is his own, co-existing as both familiar and foreign terrain.

PDNedu Student Photo Contest

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The PDNedu Student Photo Contest is open to students of undergraduate, graduate and certificate programs, and also includes a category for high school students. Winners and honorable mentions will be recognized in the Spring 2017 issue of PDNedu, which has a circulation of 50,000 copies to students and educators nationwide. Featured photographers will also be promoted to PDN‘s online audience of more than 350,000 followers.

Grand-prize winners will also receive prizes that include a Nikon DSLR camera, $150 to B&H Photo and Video and a portfolio consultation with an editor at PDN or a contest judge.

 

For more information and to enter, visit https://contest.pdnedu.com.

Fakes & Forgeries: Legal Challenges Panel Discussion, 11/29

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Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at 5:30 pm to 8:30 pm

Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, Arnhold Hall
55 West 13th Street, Room I-202, New York, NY 10011

Join the School of Art, Media, and Technology for an insightful panel discussion exploring the legal and cultural implications of art fakes and forgeries, as soon through some of the most famous art forgery cases in history.

Program:

5.00 – 5.30PM  Arrival & Registration

5.30 – 7:00PM Panel Discussion

7:00 – 8.30PM Networking Reception

Panelists:
The Honorable Judge Paul G. Gardephe, United States District Court for the Southern District of New York

Ms. Philippa Loengard, Deputy Director and Lecturer in Law, Kemochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts, Columbia Law School

Professor James Ramer, Artist and Associate Professor, Director MFA Photography, The New School/Parsons

Moderator:
Rick King, Executive Vice President & Chief Information Officer Thomson Reuters

This panel is presented by Thomson Reuters and Parsons MFA Photography

BFA Photo Faculty Justine Kurland Featured on The New Yorker

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“Simply Nutritious Morning Blend,” 2008.

Justine Kurland, photographer and BFA Photo faculty was recently featured on The New Yorker website, alongside an article she wrote entitled Six Years on the Road, as an Artist and a MotherThe article describes her journey trekking across the United States over a span of 6 years with her young son, Casper:

We crossed the country many, many times. Our migrations followed the weather, so that the barefoot pleasures of summer could extend as long as possible into the winter months. We climbed rocks in the desert and trees in the forest, built forts out of sticks, and spiced our mud pies with pine needles. A bump in the road would jostle an assortment of glass jars, spilling insect specimens onto the floor of the van. The next day, we would wake up with ladybugs in our hair; I discovered that they bite. Casper thought it was normal—thought other mamas loaded sheet film at McDonald’s, other kids stacked rocks while their parents composed scenes. On waking from a nap in his car seat, he might ask me, “Where are we, Mama? Are we shopping for views?” Or, pointing out a van along the way, he would inquire, “Who lives in that Mama Car?” Often, people thought we were homeless and offered us food or money. Other parents would pull their children away from us in playgrounds: “Suzy,” they would say, “come play over here.”

Her work is also a part of an upcoming photo book published by Aperture.

BFACD Faculty Highlight: Tamara Maletic

Tamara Maletic began graphic design studio Linked by Air with partner Dan Michaelson in 2005. Linked by Air specializes in the creation of design systems and technological platforms that grow with institutions. Since 2005, they’ve worked with major cultural and educational organizations, charities, artists, architects, and corporations. The studio sometimes describes its expertise as the “production of public space,” whether in the world or online. Its interest is in creating systems that work for all their constituents, and that show their health by evolving successfully over time. Along with co-creating Linked by Air, Tamara teaches Core Typography in the Communication Design department. You can learn more about Linked by Air’s work on their website, Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

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Eleven different computer programs in Prada’s New York store transformed and twisted customers’ images in beautiful and fun ways as they moved past. As a vendor to 2×4.

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The new identity for Columbia Books on Architecture and the City is a permanent placeholder whose aspect ratio always shifts to match the aspect ratio of the object it’s imprinted upon. The cover of the catalog displays many versions of the mark, corresponding to the different sizes of the books in the catalog.

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The Away With Words app is award-winning cinematographer Christopher Doyle’s celebration of how words and images collide to form new, often ironic associations. Users are encouraged to make their own associations with Chris’s street photographs, by attaching new words and images to existing ones.